Features

  • Hunger, foreign debt and Uganda’s fairytale budgets

    Despite the evidence of worsening poverty, the government felt sufficiently confident in this year’s budget speech to move the target date for attaining middle-income status forward by two decades. Originally planned for 2040, the new status will now be attained in three years. Agricultural output is going to be increased, educational outcomes improved and corruption eliminated. Just like that.

  • World's poor to suffer most unless developed countries act fast on climate change

    Storms and hurricanes are becoming more severe due to warmer sea temperatures.  Low lying island nations now experience annual flooding with the seawater contaminating groundwater supplies.  Whether it is flooding or drought, or any other climate related catastrophic event, the poor nations of the world and their populations suffer most.

  • The rise of fascism in Europe

    A basic feature of today's imperialist world – the division of the globe into the feasting and the fed upon – has become so unbearable that millions of people in Africa, Asia and Latin America would rather risk death than accept the future that a country oppressed by imperialism can offer them. This, in turn, is seen as a threat to the serenity and stability of Europe.

  • EU’s ‘aid for trade’ policy towards Africa

    Africa’s share of global trade remains insignificant because it faces numerous challenges: customs procedures, a lack of infrastructure and information as well as poor market integration. While there are expectations that the EU trade policy and the WTO negotiations could improve Africa’s trade, there is an increasing need for African countries to consider other alternatives for trade performance.

  • Q&A: Senfo Tonkam, an African revolutionary

    Senfo Tonkam still retains his anti-imperialist militancy and radical outlook after two decades in exile. The liberation of Africa, he insists, is not yet complete. The struggle continues. And no African will ever be free until all Black people everywhere in the world are free

  • Bobi Wine and the politics of transition in Uganda

    His soaring popularity comes from his strong repertoire of protest music that forcefully speaks truth to power. If Bobi Wine’s new body of artistic work has a singular thrust, it is that people can fully enjoy their inalienable rights only for as long as they are willing to fight for them. It is a battle he is prepared for in any way possible, including exchanging punches if need be.

  • Paul Kagame is not Papa Africa saving slaves

    Kagame runs a brutal, US-backed regime with the ninth highest per capita incarceration rate in the world. State surveillance is so pervasive that Rwandans fear to trust their own family and neighbours. Latest investigative reports about African deportees to Rwanda from Israel reveal horrific abuses. Does that sound like a government ready to open its arms to its African brothers and sisters?

Food & Health

  • WHO: I told you Tedros Adhanom is an empty suit!

    What kind of a moron appoints Robert Mugabe as goodwill ambassador for health? That is what the new Ethiopian-born Director General of the World Health Organization did – sparking global consternation. The appointment, now reversed, underlines one fact: Tedros Adhanom lacks what it takes to head even a village clinic.

  • Charter of the North African Network for Food Sovereignty

    Activists from anti-capitalist militant organizations in North Africa met in Tunis on 4th and 5th July 2017 to set up the North African Network for Food Sovereignty. The network is a unifying structure for struggles in the region and will be involved in local, continental and international mobilisation.

  • Open letter to WHO on industrial animal farming

    On 23 May 2017 Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus of Ethiopia was elected WHO Director-General. In a letter released a head of the election, over 200 scientists, policy experts and others concerned persons are urging the new Director-General to recognize and address factory farming as a growing public health challenge. Just as the WHO has bravely confronted companies that harm human health by peddling tobacco and sugar-sweetened beverages, it must not waver in advocating for the regulation of industrial animal farming.

  • Somalia: A country devastated by drought, famine and conflict

    Somalia’s president has declared the famine ravaging the country a national disaster. There has been little response from the world.  Drought is a natural calamity that can happen anywhere, but what makes it more deadly in Somalia is the continued conflict that prevents relief aid from reaching the needy or makes it difficult for affected nomads to travel to other places to find help.

Land Rights & Environment

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