Issue Title

This paper clarifies the idea of identity politics, explores the varied justifications behind it, evaluates the criticisms voiced against it and promotes a socialistic perspective on the matter.

The working class exists for humanity; if it is to radically change the world, it must wage its own war against the “I” and for the “We”, learning about and building on the struggles of the past to save humanity. 

The author reports on the Walter Rodney conference, which took place in March 2019 at the London’s School of Oriental and African Studies and whose theme was “On Walter Rodney: Pan-Afrikanism, Marxism and the Next Generation”.

The author posits that to successfully fight and defeat the rise of authoritarian populist politics, a new system of direct democracy based around federated communes and workers’ co-operatives that produce to meet people’s needs have to be put in place. 

In this article, the author wonders whether Marxism, as a framework of analysis and reference, is relevant in Africa, especially in this time where the capitalist system has accelerated its exploitation of the working class labour.  

Tagged under: 884, Dominic Brown, Economics

Greetings. We write to urge you to support the international and domestic efforts to thwart the Unites States’ unlawful attempts to change the existing governments in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the Republic of Cuba. 

In order to celebrate the International Women’s Day and the Year of Women, the author shares a profile of young Ugandan woman who is doing commendable work in her society. 

Mass demonstrations against imperialist hegemony have rocked the western hemisphere’s poorest nation of Haiti. 

Racism anywhere is racism everywhere. No matter its form, it is an aberration and should be condemned by everybody. 

Today [27 February], we pause to remember one of the great warriors of our race, uBaw’uHlathi, uMangaliso Sobukwe. 41 years ago, on this day, he died mysteriously at the Kimberley hospital (now Robert Sobukwe hospital), in the Land of Kgosi Galeshewe.

Chido Onumah, a Nigerian author and journalist, calls on his countrywomen and men not to dwell on the so-called “Igbo question”, but rather focus their attention on seriously addressing the “national/Nigeria question” before it destroys the whole country. 

PAI, a global organization that champions policies that ensure every woman has quality reproductive health care is seeking a Communications Consultant, Global Gag Rule Project (Asia). 

PAI, a global organization that champions policies that ensure every woman has quality reproductive health care is seeking a Communications Consultant, Global Gag Rule Project (East Africa Region)

Tagged under: 883, Jobs, Jobs, PAI, PAI

The massacre in Christchurch mosques raises doubt about the applicability of the theory by Martin Luther King Jr. that injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere

After 43 years of failing to legalise its invasion of Western Sahara, Morocco needs to accept a process that would lead to a just, lasting, realistic and mutually acceptable solution to the aspirations of the Saharawi people. 

Beginning in the early decades of the 15th century, the African continent faced an unprecedented onslaught where human traffickers and colonisers sought to conquer the people for the purpose of labour exploitation, strategic territorial advantage and the plunder of natural resources.

Michael D. Yates, in chapter 5 of his recently released book – Can the Working Class Change the World?– conducts an important task of assessing the power of capital. Below is a review of that chapter. 

The author argues that the latest attacks against the government of Nicolas Maduro is nothing else, but a continuation of a historical United States-led western imperialist project in Latin America. 

At this stage of the revolution, the student movement must sharpen its tools of analysis and wage a fight against the hijacking of decolonisation by university managers and its commodification by the market. 

What has the working class achieved so far in its war for emancipation? Are not the exploited of the earth encountering unfinished work in their struggles against the most experienced and resource-rich class the world has witnessed till today? These questions are apposite while examining the class struggle on the world stage.

Not since the US pronounced the Monroe Doctrine proclaiming its imperial supremacy over Latin America, nearly 200 years ago, has a White House regime so openly affirmed its mission to recolonise Latin America.

As Russia prepares to host the first ever Africa-Russia summit in October 2019, the author looks at Africans’ expectations of this new relationship between the former Soviet Union and African countries in the face of growing competition for the continent’s resources. 

Reflecting on vital roles that women play in society, the author argues that our communities need men of integrity for the full realisation of gender equity and mutual respect. 

From the antebellum period through the Civil War and Jim Crow the issues of gender and race were interwoven.

From Seneca Falls to the Civil War and Reconstruction the struggle for national liberation and gender equality took centre stage. 

The discovery of oil off the coastal waters of Guyana occasioned widespread speculation the small South American nation was in for a boom that could fund development efforts. However, that optimism may need to be tempered if details of the deal between the Georgetown government and the oil giants are any indication of things to come.

Barely two months after President Trump unexpectedly announced that he plans to withdraw US troops from Syria, his decision continues to attract media attention and commentary. While commentary was initially directed toward speculation on the reasons why he decided to withdraw from Syria so abruptly, speculation nowadays seems to be fixed on what exactly is meant by a “rapid withdrawal” and what this decision means for American interests. 

Upon taking power in a palace coup a year ago, Cyril Ramaphosa’s African National Congress (ANC) government was supposedly going to sweep out the prolific corruptionassociated with the 2009-18 Jacob Zuma ANC regime. But although excruciatingly-slow progress is being made in evicting the most obvious villains, durable Zumite influences remain, and whistleblowing continues to unveil rapid ANC degeneracy, even stretching into the Ramaphosa family

The biggest youth movement in Swaziland, the Swaziland Youth Congress, called for democracy at its 12th national congress last weekend. The congress was held in South Africa because of repression in Swaziland against organisations that call for democracy. 

This month marks the eighth anniversary of the uprising that culminated in the imperialist assault on Libya by North Atlantic Treaty Organisation forces and the killing eight months later of long-time leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

Imperialism has initiated a provocation for beginning its planned military intervention in Venezuela. Imperialism is treading a bloody path, the path it prefers. It needs the blood-soaked path. Already it has spilled blood along Brazil border.

The leaders of the 18th century separatist movement from England were not motivated by a genuine desire for freedom and equality.

Six months from now, a commemoration of the long saga of struggle against national oppression and economic exploitation will take place. 

The author believes that the current challenges that Ghana is facing are largely due to the fact that the ruling elites have refused to learn from the past and continue making the same mistakes of opportunistic, short-sighted and divisive politics.   

Radical educators and revolutionaries worldwide are bewildered by the question—which education is of most value? –as universities, colleges and schools turn into centres of oppression, perpetuating the dominant authoritarian discourse. 

This article looks at how African countries are amassing unsustainable loans, mostly from China to fund their infrastructural projects. Is Africa turning out to be a remedy for China’s over-accumulation problem by serving as a major locale for a spatio-temporal fix?

Tagged under: 881, Economics, Tim Zajontz

The author deplores the rapidly deteriorating socio-economic and political situation in Zimbabwe one year after President Mnangagwa took office. 

In this keynote speech that Professor Issa Shivji gave at the launch of African Humanities Programme books at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on 1 February 2019, he calls on the African intelligentsia to construct a counter-hegemonic project in the face of new nationalisms. 

This is an interview with Senfo Tonkam, a former Cameroonian student leader exiled in Germany, in which he discusses issues affecting Black people in the world including linguistic divides and tribalism among other problems. 

Philanthropy, of various forms and origin, occupies a central, well-accepted position in the nations of Africa today. Invoking an historic confrontation between the supporters and opponents of Rag Day at the University of Dar es Salaam, this article presents a radical critique of such philanthropy. Though it occurred in 1968, the contrasting attitudes towards charity it depicts are of primary importance for the realisation of genuine social and economic progress in Africa today.

The author wonders whether existentialism could have been the reason behind the recent firing of Nigeria’s Chief Justice Walter Nkanu Onnoghen by President Buhari. 

Why has Liberia not enacted dual citizenship or repealed a constitutional “Negro clause”?

This paper discusses the crisis facing South Africa’s state-owned company Eskom and its general relationship to people’s struggle and the pursuit for energy alternatives.

In this article, the author talks about the complicity of non-governmental organisations and mining companies in impoverishing the people of Moroto, northeast of Uganda. 

Swaziland’s government has been evicting farmers from their land to expand the monarchy-controlled sugar industry for decades. After years of empty promises that they could return, the children of farmers from Mbuluzi are fighting to get their land back.

Reflecting her first personal encounter with Samir Amin, the author believes that Samir Amin’s work will continue to be a tool for change and to challenge capitalism, especially in these days of rapidly rising inequalities.

This piece seeks to help most of Igbo friends and well-wishers and some Igbo who are involved in the campaign of Biafra without a clear understanding of the picture of what we are fighting for. It will help many to have a better grip of what is at stake. 

The first phase of imperialism’s direct intervention in Venezuela has started. Progressive people all over the world should clear denounce this blatant assault on Bolivarian Revolution. 

The coordinator of Saharawi video activist group Equipe Mediawas assaulted, injured and interrogated by Moroccan police in the Moroccan colony of Western Sahara. 

A number of African countries facing internal politico-economic challenges including Zimbabwe are turning to Russia not only for financial help in terms of investments and loans, but also for political support. 

Controversies. There have been all sorts of controversies at MISR at the behest of Mamdani. It all goes back to the beginning. The precedent was set at the onset – that Mamdani was too important to play by the rules.

It should be agreed that there are different ways of apprehending and describing the situation in Nigeria as the country draws near “Election 2019”, the general elections beginning on 16 February 2019. But I have chosen, naturally and unsurprisingly, an angle and a perspective informed by the burning interests of the working, toiling and poor masses of the country. 

The year 2018 ended on a high note for the Nigeria born writer Mohammed Umar who is celebrating in London after getting his books translated and published into 50 languages. 

Pentagon bombing operations against the Horn of Africa state of Somalia have killed numerous people over the last several weeks under the guise of the United States “war on terrorism.”

Once again, a formidable burst of state brutality against Zimbabwe’s citizenry has left at least a dozen corpses, scores of serious injuries, mass arrests, Internet suspension and a furious citizenry. The 14-17 January nationwide protests were called by trade unions against an unprecedented fuel price hike, leading to repression reminiscent of former leader Robert Mugabe’s iron fist.

Happy New Year Pambazuka Newsworld! Hopefully, we can all keep our New Year resolutions! This time I, too, want to maintain and excel at all my resolutions, especially, to stay here, writing forever!

The author argues that the failure of the Ghanaian Left to build on the legacy of Kwame Nkrumah is giving a good opportunity to the centre-right ruling party to develop and cement its neo-liberal ideology. 

Reflecting on the 9 March 2018 handshake between Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta and leader Raila Odinga, the author wonders if that reconciliatory moment ushered in a new democratic dispensation in Kenya. 

After more than six decades since the gathering of the first All-African People’s Conference (AAPC) in Accra, Ghana on 8-13 December 1958, renewal of revolutionary Pan-Africanism is needed on the continent and globally. 

To what extent has the working class been an agent of radical change? The author discusses steps, proposed in the third chapter of Can the Working Class Change the World?, that need to be taken for workers to bring about radical change.  

In this review of Can the Working Class Change the World?, the authorreflects on the question whether the working class can defeat capitalism, its chief antagonist. 

World Bank president Jim Kim is an ex-leftist who claims that in the mid-1990s he wanted to shut down the Bank. At the time, it was an entirely valid, realistic goal of the 50 Years is Enough! Campaign and especially the World Bank Bonds Boycott. Kim’s co-edited Dying for Growth (2000) book-length analysis of the Bank’s attacks on global South public health offered very useful ammunition.

In this essay, the author talks about the current limited involvement of Russia on the African continent and the need to increase it to the level of the former Soviet Union’s ties with Africa.  

Using the conceptual frameworks of “revolutionary rupture” and “contradictions”, as analytical tools to understanding the successes and failures of revolutionary movements in the world, the author argues that 2019 could be a year of “revolutionary rupture”.  

Tagged under: 880, Global South, Yash Tandon

The old guard of South Africa’s ruling party put on new clothes last year, and a new party of the working class finally made its debut.

The author argues that the Nigerian Left is the only political formation that can bring about genuine change in Nigeria, as the country’s ruling class has not been able to produce a winning alliance of parties that can offer Nigerians anything new. 

Having read the two books written by Nigeria’s former Minister of Finance, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala and the recent book by the former President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan, I have come to an un-researched conclusion that Nigerian politicians do not know how to talk politics. 

Efforts of Africa’s unity and regional integration are obstructed by continuing outside interference and destabilisation of the continent. 

Experts and researchers have observed that, since the collapse of the Soviet-era politics, an appreciable level of media cooperation has never been on the side of Russia’s public diplomacy with Africa.

According to the author, Africa must break its dependency on capitalism and instead resolve internal contradictions, which are a reflection of the on-going exploitation and oppression engendered by the post-colonial construct to benefit the West. 

This is part two of a seven-part series of the review of Can the Working Class Change the World?.

From the Democratic Republic of Congo to Sudan the need for continental solutions is apparent.

This is part one of a seven-part series introducing the review of Can the Working Class Change the World?

Estimates demonstrate that, over the last 40 years, Nigeria has been loosing billions of dollars daily to corruption and wastages of the country’s resources. 

The author argues that President Trump’s proposed new Africa strategy seeks to make geo-economics the governing and guiding principle of US foreign policy on the continent. 

A recent conference in South Africa raised issues on whether universal healthcare should be a private or state-driven endeavour.

Trade union renewal is high on the agenda in many countries, but we need to think carefully about why we want it.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights turned 70 on 12 December and governments and civil society organisations around the world were commemorating the day with a range of activities.  However, the threat of illicit financial flows to the respect of human seems to have been forgotten on that day. 

Tagged under: 879, Economics, Imani Countess

On what has been hailed as a great day and a milestone for the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region, the plenary assembly session of the SADC parliamentary forum recently adopted the first ever SADC model law on elections.

The minimum wage law, the land question and the economics of imperialism are to shape the character of the coming electoral period in South Africa. 

This week’s hush-hush visit by International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde to Pretoria (between stops in Ghana and Angola) is mysterious. In contrast to last week’s IMF press briefing claim – “Madame Lagarde will hold meetings with the authorities, as well as fairly extensive meetings with the private sector, civil society, academia, women leaders, and of course the media” – there is a complete information void here, with no public events scheduled.

I am a young African man with four university qualifications under his belt, yet, as is the case with many of my peers, adequate employment has been a challenge to obtain on offer.

One thing supporters of President Muhammadu Buhari can’t deny is that many of those who oppose him today, almost three and half years after he was sworn in as the fourth president of the Fourth Republic, rooted for him 2015. Many of them are not politicians; they are not angry because President Buhari has blocked their illegal sources of wealth; and they are not people who have cases with anti-corruption agencies. I am one of them. 

The President of South African trade federation COSATU met with Swazi sugar cane farmers and promised to help them regain control of their land from Swaziland’s absolute monarch King Mswati III. 

The authors draw our attention to the danger of growth at all costs, especially to the environment and the livelihoods of marginalised communities, especially in Kenya and other developing countries.  

Samir Amin died on August 12, 2018. In July of 2018 he published a call for the establishment of a global fifth international that could coordinate and provide support to progressive social movements. Amin, Samir 2018 “Letter of Intent for an Inaugural Meeting of the International of Workers and Peoples” IDEAs network, July 3. 

In his review ofProtection, Patronage or Plunder?by Apollo Nelson Makubuya, Professor Yash Tandon concurs with the author that the “Buganda Question” is an issue that would not disappear from the records of Uganda’s history, and thus needed to be candidly debated and addressed. 

In this essay, the author deplores the current generation’s unwillingness to learn the “ways of life” from elders in African villages including the culture of reading and seeking for knowledge that characterised that generation of the 1950s and 1960s. 

In this essay, the author asserts that, despite the incumbent President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Muhammadu Buhari, appearing to be in a strong position before the 2019 general elections, the opposition candidate Atiku Abubakar would not be a “walk-over” in the contest.

The author writes about the impact the All Africa People’s Conference that was organised in December 1958 in Ghana had on liberation movements in Southern Africa, especially in Zimbabwe. 

The place of intellectualism is quite pronounced in international affairs much as is mired in defined controversies often emanating from society’s built perceptions.

Do the findings of the recent Afrobarometer survey on The Gambia’s Truth, Reconciliation and Reparations Commission affirm the fact that truth and reconciliation mechanisms are snowflake mechanisms that are incapable of delivering justice for the victims of human rights violations?

Professor Horace Campbell argues that Africa needs a new alliance of traders, workers, small farmers, progressive students, cultural artists and religious leaders to create a new movement for putting in place the mechanisms for the unification and freedom of Africa and not the current reformist leaders that the continent has. 

Since March of 2015, the United States has engineered and guided a genocidal war against the people of Yemen. Daily bombing operations by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition has killed tens of thousands of people, injured and sickened hundreds of thousands more and created the worse humanitarian crisis in the world.

6 November 2018 was a day in which people across the United States and indeed the world were watching for some indications of the future political prospects for the leading capitalist state.

Thomas Jefferson should have known about Ethiopia.  That was what the late, great Pan-Africanist scholar Ali Mazrui suggested in his keynote address to a conference held at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, in 2007.  I assisted Mazrui with research for that address and was honoured to travel with him to Ithaca and listen to his presentation as he reflected on Ethiopia with characteristic imagination and historical sensitivity.  

From Cape to Cairo, there is a wide-ranging call for decolonising the university curriculum and to some extent primary and secondary school programmes. This call is motivated by the inability of the current knowledge produced at African universities to transform the society, and to respond to the socio-economic needs of our continent, mother Africa.

The author writes about double marginalisation faced by Africans in the diaspora, especially those living in the United States of America. 

This is a summary of a historic week for Argentina at the heart of the current economic turmoil. 

With the election of Jair Bolsonaro – who said he would rather be called a Hitler than gay – Brazil’s electoral system has brought fascism to power. It would be hard to overstate the impact this will have on the country, the continent and the world. 

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