Issue Title

This week, the annual meeting of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund will again be held in Washington, DC, with back-slapping now that the Bretton Woods twins have reached age 75 (they were founded at a New Hampshire hotel in 1944). And with more passion than in recent years, there will be protests, especially climate activists on Friday [18 October] at noon with a strong set of messages, to “end all funding for fossil fuels!”

Mahatma Gandhi was born on 2 October 1869 – 150 years ago. I write this in honour of this great man; and make a brief assessment of his life and philosophy, and the enormous legacy he left behind.

The author posits that from the perspective of African women, it is impossible to ignore racism and sexism while organising against poverty.

During the early morning hours of 6 September, a news item shook the international community saying that President Robert Gabriel Mugabe, known affectionately as “Gushungo”, had passed away at the age of 95.

Despite some shortcomings in his policies, Mugabe could not be pushed to betray the people of Zimbabwe and Africa in general.  

The authors write about the importance of the prospect of gender parity in the Fourth Industrial Revolution, especially in terms of how the digital economy could help shift the playing field towards greater women empowerment.

The Rwandan regime continues to receive billions of US dollars in aid while ordinary people in Rwanda and Congo remain in misery.drc

Farmers of Shashe, a village in Masvingo Province, Zimbabwe, are becoming an African inspiration for agroecology and emancipation.

The author argues that the Rwanda-Burundi’s dark colonisation past helps us understand the deep-rooted causes of the 1994 Rwandan genocide. 

We must arm ourselves with theologies of liberation and a spirituality of resistance if we are to successfully challenge and overcome the forces of the Empire that we are up against.

The author argues that Africanisation or decolonisation has little to do with institutions of higher education, but more about the death-prone position that the Black body continues to occupy in a world violently constructed by whiteness.

Five decades ago thousands gathered in Algiers to recommit to revolutionary transformation around the world.

Through this piece of art, the artist expresses his views on what he calls “sustainable art”.

The report of the South African President’s Advisory Panel on Land Reform and Agriculture was released to the public on 28 July 2019 and is being reviewed by the cabinet. The important question is whether this report offers a vision and recommendations that can address the land issue in South Africa.

An investigation has found out that the 13 November 2018 attack on Lasalin was government-orchestrated and was executed by the police in collaboration with criminal elements.

As Russia prepares to strengthen its overall corporate economic profile during the African leaders’ summit, policy experts are questioning bilateral agreements that were signed, many of them largely remained unimplemented, at least, for the past decade with various African countries.

Amidst all wrangling and shenanigans going on in South Africa, I read that Singapore was ranked the world’s most competitive economy in world. The first question that came to mind was how did a small island state measuring about one third the size of eThekwini Municipality become the most successful economy globally? I was truly astounded.

For the Nigerian Left, the strongest lesson of what may now be called Nigeria’s #RevolutionNow—that is, the 5 August mass protests organised by some young fragments of the movement—may be formulated as a warning.

To halt the decision to extradite Mozambique’s former Finance minister, Manuel Chang, could be a test case for President Ramaphosa’s long-term ability to bring about real change in South Africa’s regional relations by potentially making it a good example for the fight against corruption.

This article recounts a major war crime committed against the people of Sudan in August 1998. Reflecting on the rationale and unfolding of this crime, it examines the veracity of the official claims, the reactions and implications of the deed. The importance of remembering our past in an accurate and unbiased manner is underscored.

Africa is a youthful population, statistics show that the population of youth and children in Africa is rising. African youth are also among the most disadvantaged in the world. This ranges from economic refugees in Europe all in a bid to try and survive , to communities ravaged by the negative impacts of HIV and Aids to countries getting destroyed by election related conflicts.

For many communities access to justice represents a near impossibility because of cost, distance, lack of knowledge and the fear of reprisal.  Paralegals utilise rapport and trust to increase access to justice for their clients.

Going through education in an institution of higher learning is often a difficult process. For many students who come from disadvantaged families, they have to juggle side jobs (side hustles) in order to survive. Some are forced to skip classes to run errands and on top of that one is expected to pass exams.

This paper’s authors argue that Africa could greatly benefit from increased engagement with Japan, and learn from the Asian giant’s experiences, as the continent has just ratified a comprehensive free trade agreement. 

In this essay, the author objects to the portrayal of Martin Luther King Jr. by biographer David Garrow arguing that such a picture would not change King’s noble legacy that the world can be changed through kindness and charity.

On 4 July, the 12th Extraordinary Summit of the African Union (AU) was held in Niamey, Niger to officially proclaim a project that is inherent within the notions of sovereignty and unity on the continent.

Russia has been looking to raise its existing relationship with African countries and Afreximbank is now providing huge support in realising that long term goal. 

The longer the Cameroonian “Anglophone Crisis” goes on, the more deeply-entrenched the bitterness among citizens becomes.

Over the years, the Saint Petersburg International Economic Forum has become an open platform to exchange best practices and key competences in the interest of providing sustainable development.

Comrade Marta died on 15 June 2019 of cancer in Canada. A relentless fighter, comrade Marta Harnecker (1937 – 2019) made valuable contributions in the areas of theory related to revolution for socialism in the broader Latin American perspective. Her struggle was for a humane world.

Ann Garrison shares her opinion on Judi Rever’s recent book, In-Praise of Blood: Crimes of the Rwandan Patriotic Front, a book that has given an audacious account of what happened during the 1994 Rwandan Genocide.

Reflecting on the recent general elections in South Africa, the author argues that there needs to be concerted efforts to building a strong movement that would lead the country towards a process of social transformation after the inevitable collapse of the ruling party.

South Africans voted overwhelmingly on 8 May for the ruling African National Congress (ANC), returning the party to government with a nearly 3-1 majority above the nearest runner up within the legislative structure.

There is need to re-look at the word “revolution” and what it currently means in politics and history, especially when compared to other forms of government change.

Edward Seaga will be remembered, as a man who advanced thuggery, violence and dehumanisation in the Jamaican society and who left the office of Prime Minister devoid of dignity, authority and values. 

This is a tribute of Eusi Kwayana to Andaiye, which captures her connection to the Rodney legacy, and the political and humanist traditions she shared with many others in Guyana and across the world, and her patent originality and uniqueness in the global struggle.

Recent higher levels of electoral choice might reflect deeper trends that could harm South Africa’s democracy in future.

The author argues that the Nigerian Left, if well organised, could represent a concrete revolutionary platform for restructuring politics in the country.

 

This article is part of the author’s research that explores trade and investments, trade policies and China’s domestic and overseas political economy.

Market women carry on Haiti’s irrepressible fight for human dignity and freedom.

This brief analysis is meant to shed some light on Sudan’s popular revolution that is ongoing amidst military crackdown on protesters who seem determined to protect their revolution without counting the cost or heeding the wounds.  Some lessons will be drawn for the rest of Africa and for the international community.sunonot

Over the years, Russia and the Republic of Congo have had good bilateral relations. Undoubtedly, there are still prospects for strengthening these relations, especially in the economic and security spheres, as underlined during the meeting between Vladimir Putin and Denis Sassou-Nguesso in the Kremlin.ce

Facing mounting security and economic challenges, will Abiy Ahmed democratise Ethiopia or take advantage of its vulnerabilities to become the next strongman?

Autopsy reveals Lonmin—the British-South African company—corpse’s poisoning by microfinance, ‘development finance’ and corporate finance. 

In a few days, the world’s third largest platinimum mining house, Lonmin, will likely be remembered as the exemplar of multinational corporate irresponsibility. As a people’s trial hosted by the Marikana Solidarity Network gets underway outside Carlton House Terrace in London, where Lonmin’s shareholders vote on a friendly takeover deal (albeit with extremely dubious characteristics), many critics are shaking their heads – and fists – at the extraordinary financial and political circumstances.

The author argues that for on-going debates about “decolonising the university” in South Africa to have any meaning, what has to be decolonised first is the mental border that remains inscribed in South African notions of decolonisation.

Workers’ protests and resistance movements that preceded Africa’s independence demonstrated the working class’s quest for a continental effectual workers alliance.

In discussing the disparities in the distribution of “development,” wealth, power and poverty in Nigeria, many people—most of them young, but educated—seem not to be conscious of two important factors, namely: the factor of history and the factor of capitalism.

High profile journalists have been jabbering about whether or not Julian Assange is really one of them. If “journalist” is understood to mean “propagandist for the ruling class,” then he most certainly is not.

The article is a review of a recent book on the PAIGC education programme in the anticolonial movement for national liberation. The piece raises questions about what a militant approach to history might be.

As election fever grips South Africa, the Economic Freedom Fighters’ manifesto stands out for its radical policy agenda and departure from the country’s political norms. It is time for South Africans – and the world – to take notice.

In this review of the American film Us, the author highlights the movie’s core message that most of the times, we, human beings, are our own enemies. 

Tagged under: 884, Arts & Books, Biko Agozino, US

Strengthening cooperation in trade, economy and culture, as well as current international and regional matters were top issues in talks between President Vladimir Putin of Russia and President João Lourenço of Angola at the Kremlin on 4 April.

If the government of Sierra Leone’s President Julius Maada Bio were to be graded on their first year’s performance in office, it is likely that their report card would read, “promising start, which they must surpass in the years ahead”.

In this interview, conducted in March 2019 by Farooque Chowdhury, Magdoff discusses the problems caused by capitalist agriculture in rural Venezuela.

The author argues that the conduct of Nigeria’s 2019 general elections demonstrated how the country had moved far away from even the lowest known standards of electoral democracy let alone being free and fair.

This article argues that the current military transition in Sudan will lead the country to nowhere unless the people continued their resistance to have a genuine civilian revolution.  

This paper clarifies the idea of identity politics, explores the varied justifications behind it, evaluates the criticisms voiced against it and promotes a socialistic perspective on the matter.

The working class exists for humanity; if it is to radically change the world, it must wage its own war against the “I” and for the “We”, learning about and building on the struggles of the past to save humanity. 

The author reports on the Walter Rodney conference, which took place in March 2019 at the London’s School of Oriental and African Studies and whose theme was “On Walter Rodney: Pan-Afrikanism, Marxism and the Next Generation”.

The author posits that to successfully fight and defeat the rise of authoritarian populist politics, a new system of direct democracy based around federated communes and workers’ co-operatives that produce to meet people’s needs have to be put in place. 

In this article, the author wonders whether Marxism, as a framework of analysis and reference, is relevant in Africa, especially in this time where the capitalist system has accelerated its exploitation of the working class labour.  

Tagged under: 884, Dominic Brown, Economics

Greetings. We write to urge you to support the international and domestic efforts to thwart the Unites States’ unlawful attempts to change the existing governments in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the Republic of Cuba. 

In order to celebrate the International Women’s Day and the Year of Women, the author shares a profile of young Ugandan woman who is doing commendable work in her society. 

Mass demonstrations against imperialist hegemony have rocked the western hemisphere’s poorest nation of Haiti. 

Racism anywhere is racism everywhere. No matter its form, it is an aberration and should be condemned by everybody. 

Today [27 February], we pause to remember one of the great warriors of our race, uBaw’uHlathi, uMangaliso Sobukwe. 41 years ago, on this day, he died mysteriously at the Kimberley hospital (now Robert Sobukwe hospital), in the Land of Kgosi Galeshewe.

Chido Onumah, a Nigerian author and journalist, calls on his countrywomen and men not to dwell on the so-called “Igbo question”, but rather focus their attention on seriously addressing the “national/Nigeria question” before it destroys the whole country. 

The massacre in Christchurch mosques raises doubt about the applicability of the theory by Martin Luther King Jr. that injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere

After 43 years of failing to legalise its invasion of Western Sahara, Morocco needs to accept a process that would lead to a just, lasting, realistic and mutually acceptable solution to the aspirations of the Saharawi people. 

Michael D. Yates, in chapter 5 of his recently released book – Can the Working Class Change the World?– conducts an important task of assessing the power of capital. Below is a review of that chapter. 

Beginning in the early decades of the 15th century, the African continent faced an unprecedented onslaught where human traffickers and colonisers sought to conquer the people for the purpose of labour exploitation, strategic territorial advantage and the plunder of natural resources.

The author argues that the latest attacks against the government of Nicolas Maduro is nothing else, but a continuation of a historical United States-led western imperialist project in Latin America. 

At this stage of the revolution, the student movement must sharpen its tools of analysis and wage a fight against the hijacking of decolonisation by university managers and its commodification by the market. 

What has the working class achieved so far in its war for emancipation? Are not the exploited of the earth encountering unfinished work in their struggles against the most experienced and resource-rich class the world has witnessed till today? These questions are apposite while examining the class struggle on the world stage.

Not since the US pronounced the Monroe Doctrine proclaiming its imperial supremacy over Latin America, nearly 200 years ago, has a White House regime so openly affirmed its mission to recolonise Latin America.

As Russia prepares to host the first ever Africa-Russia summit in October 2019, the author looks at Africans’ expectations of this new relationship between the former Soviet Union and African countries in the face of growing competition for the continent’s resources. 

Reflecting on vital roles that women play in society, the author argues that our communities need men of integrity for the full realisation of gender equity and mutual respect. 

From the antebellum period through the Civil War and Jim Crow the issues of gender and race were interwoven.

From Seneca Falls to the Civil War and Reconstruction the struggle for national liberation and gender equality took centre stage. 

The discovery of oil off the coastal waters of Guyana occasioned widespread speculation the small South American nation was in for a boom that could fund development efforts. However, that optimism may need to be tempered if details of the deal between the Georgetown government and the oil giants are any indication of things to come.

Barely two months after President Trump unexpectedly announced that he plans to withdraw US troops from Syria, his decision continues to attract media attention and commentary. While commentary was initially directed toward speculation on the reasons why he decided to withdraw from Syria so abruptly, speculation nowadays seems to be fixed on what exactly is meant by a “rapid withdrawal” and what this decision means for American interests. 

Upon taking power in a palace coup a year ago, Cyril Ramaphosa’s African National Congress (ANC) government was supposedly going to sweep out the prolific corruptionassociated with the 2009-18 Jacob Zuma ANC regime. But although excruciatingly-slow progress is being made in evicting the most obvious villains, durable Zumite influences remain, and whistleblowing continues to unveil rapid ANC degeneracy, even stretching into the Ramaphosa family

The biggest youth movement in Swaziland, the Swaziland Youth Congress, called for democracy at its 12th national congress last weekend. The congress was held in South Africa because of repression in Swaziland against organisations that call for democracy. 

This month marks the eighth anniversary of the uprising that culminated in the imperialist assault on Libya by North Atlantic Treaty Organisation forces and the killing eight months later of long-time leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

Imperialism has initiated a provocation for beginning its planned military intervention in Venezuela. Imperialism is treading a bloody path, the path it prefers. It needs the blood-soaked path. Already it has spilled blood along Brazil border.

The leaders of the 18th century separatist movement from England were not motivated by a genuine desire for freedom and equality.

Six months from now, a commemoration of the long saga of struggle against national oppression and economic exploitation will take place. 

The author believes that the current challenges that Ghana is facing are largely due to the fact that the ruling elites have refused to learn from the past and continue making the same mistakes of opportunistic, short-sighted and divisive politics.   

Radical educators and revolutionaries worldwide are bewildered by the question—which education is of most value? –as universities, colleges and schools turn into centres of oppression, perpetuating the dominant authoritarian discourse. 

This article looks at how African countries are amassing unsustainable loans, mostly from China to fund their infrastructural projects. Is Africa turning out to be a remedy for China’s over-accumulation problem by serving as a major locale for a spatio-temporal fix?

Tagged under: 881, Economics, Tim Zajontz

The author deplores the rapidly deteriorating socio-economic and political situation in Zimbabwe one year after President Mnangagwa took office. 

In this keynote speech that Professor Issa Shivji gave at the launch of African Humanities Programme books at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on 1 February 2019, he calls on the African intelligentsia to construct a counter-hegemonic project in the face of new nationalisms. 

This is an interview with Senfo Tonkam, a former Cameroonian student leader exiled in Germany, in which he discusses issues affecting Black people in the world including linguistic divides and tribalism among other problems. 

Philanthropy, of various forms and origin, occupies a central, well-accepted position in the nations of Africa today. Invoking an historic confrontation between the supporters and opponents of Rag Day at the University of Dar es Salaam, this article presents a radical critique of such philanthropy. Though it occurred in 1968, the contrasting attitudes towards charity it depicts are of primary importance for the realisation of genuine social and economic progress in Africa today.

The author wonders whether existentialism could have been the reason behind the recent firing of Nigeria’s Chief Justice Walter Nkanu Onnoghen by President Buhari. 

Why has Liberia not enacted dual citizenship or repealed a constitutional “Negro clause”?

This paper discusses the crisis facing South Africa’s state-owned company Eskom and its general relationship to people’s struggle and the pursuit for energy alternatives.

In this article, the author talks about the complicity of non-governmental organisations and mining companies in impoverishing the people of Moroto, northeast of Uganda. 

Pambazuka News 800: After Trump: Defying neoliberalism and impunity

The Paris Climate Agreement, adopted in 2015, has generally been received with much enthusiasm by governments and others actors, although others did not share the same level of optimism and enthusiasm. Criticisms ranged from the inadequacy of the goals outlined in the Agreement, which analysts say do not measure up to the gravity and urgency of the problem as evidenced by science; while others point to the democratic deficit in the process of agreeing to the global goals as well as with countries coming up with their ‘intended nationally determined contributions’ (INDCs) to global climate action. 

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